Canada in London

Having lived outside my home and native land for 4 years now, I’ve started to get a little more sentimental as each Canada Day passes.  Last year, I wanted to find as many little bits of home as I could around London, England.  Here’s what I found that sunny Canada Day:

 

Canada Water Underground/Overground Station

Canada Water Underground Station

This is where I started the day.  Canada Water Station is in Rotherhithe in south-east London on the Jubilee line (in zone 2).  It takes its name from Canada Water, the fresh water lake and wildlife refuge nearby.

 

Canada Water

Canada Water

Canada Water is a freshwater lake in Rotherhithe, south-east of London.  The lake was named after Canada Dock where Canadian ships formerly berthed.  Most of the docks have been closed for over 40 years but a portion of it was converted into the lake.  It is also a wildlife refuge and is being topped up with ground water.  There were many varieties of birds floating and flying around.

 

Quebec Way and Canada Street

Quebec Way

Not too far from Canada Water and the underground station were these small streets. They weren’t the biggest or the longest but a little piece of Canada nonetheless.

 

 Dentist Office

Canada Kids Dental

My trip didn’t take me into the dentist office; I took a picture and ran!

 

Canada Water Library

Canada Water Library

Canada Water library (and Waters Edge Cafe) on Canada Water, has been open since 2011 and are a part of the Docklands redevelopment projects.  The library’s stunning design both inside and out are definitely worth checking out.  If that’s not enough to tempt you…

Coffee at Waters Edge     Treats at Waters Edge

Does this help?  I took my research seriously and didn’t miss a bite… I mean bit.  Maybe I should’ve visited the dentist?

 

Ontario Point

Ontario Point

Looking for a flat in London?  This property hosts a stunning view of Canada Water and is a stone’s throw from the library.  If you have some spare cash (quite a lot of spare cash) this could be the place for you.

 

One Canada Square

One Canada Square

A quick hop onto the underground led me to Canary Warf.  One Canada Square was the tallest building in the UK until 2010 when the construction of the Shard began.  It’s mainly used for offices with some shops on the main level.  The iconic pyramid roof houses an aircraft warning light to warn passing aircraft.  It’s a pretty busy spot and it took ages to get a photo without people revolving round.

 

Canada Square Park

Canada Square Park

A green space in Canary Warf in which to escape the offices and the city rush.  Although there was a lot on the go (at the time there were screens set up showing the Wimbledon Tennis) it still offered a calm retreat.

 

Canada House

Back on the underground and resurfacing at Charing Cross was my next stop.  Home to the Canadian High Commission, Canada House sits on Trafalgar Square in the heart of London.  Last Canada day it was under scaffolding but has since been unwrapped and reopened as of 19 Feb 2015 by the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh.  You can’t miss it surrounded by numerous Canadian Flags.

 

Street Art

Street Art

Also on Trafalgar Square, this artist wished Canada a Happy Birthday.

 

Maple Leaf Pub

Maple Leaf Pub

The Maple Leaf is a pub in Covent Garden. As quoted from their website, it’s “A little piece of Canada in the heart of London”. Amongst the red and white clothing of its patrons, the menu that contains chicken wings and poutine and the Canadian Beer on tap, it can sooth the home sickness of most Canadians abroad.

http://www.themapleleaflondon.co.uk/

 

Canada Gate

Canada Gate

Located on the south side of Green Park, adjacent to the Canada Memorial, it is the ceremonial entrance to the park off the Mall. Styled as those of Buckingham palace, the gate showcases the 7 Canadian provinces of the time of construction. It was installed in 1911 as a gift from Canada as a memorial to Queen Victoria’s death in 1901.

 

Canada Memorial

Canada Memorial

Canada Memorial is located in Green Park next to Buckingham Palace. Designed by Canadian sculptor Pierre Granche, it honours the thousands of Canadian Forces members killed during both World Wars.  The image above is just a small part of the memorial that should be seen.  It is an angled sculpture with bronzed maple leaves is covered by a thin flow of water.  The pigeons aren’t part of the memorial although they are a regular feature in the flowing water.

 

Given the fact that I only spent one day looking, I’m certain there are many more little pieces of Canada hidden around the diverse city that is London. Have you found pieces of Canada in London? If so, comment below so your fellow Canadian expats can enjoy them too.

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